Germantown

Company plans for the future of stem cell use

by Samantha Schmieder

Staff Writer

Next Healthcare Inc. of Germantown recently launched a partnership with Arizona Cardinals wide reciever Larry Fitzgerald to promote its newest venture, CelBank Pro to other professional athletes.

Next Healthcares CelBank is the collection of cell samples and storage of their blood, skin or stem cells to be used in the future. Stem cells are unspecialized cells that are able to renew themselves through cell division and can be scientifically manipulated to become another type of cell with a more specialized function. They offer hope to provide new ways to fight disease or injuries, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Essentially we are in the business of banking cells for people, Vin Singh, the founder and CEO of Next Healthcare, said.

While CelBank is geared toward anyone interested in using their own cells later in their life, CelBank Pro is geared toward sports players who are very likely to get injured or just worn down during their career.

Skin cells and stem cells are stored at a healthy time at someones life for later use in regenerative medicine, Singh said.

In 2006 and 2007, Singh, who lives in Boyds, heard about a method in Japan that was able to turn adult skin cells into stem cells. Singh decided to build Next Healthcare around these induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells.

For me that was the real spark. I heard about that and thought, Wow, this is an amazing, revolutionary breakthrough, Singh said. Thats where the idea came from, what can we do with that technology. There has to be something that I can do for consumers to give them an advantage.

See the original post here:
Germantown

Comments Off

Stem cells used in landmark therapy for failing sight

A Japanese woman with macular degeneration is the first person to be treated with induced pluripotent stem cells, made from her own skin

See the original post here:
Stem cells used in landmark therapy for failing sight

Comments Off

Japan stem-cell trial stirs envy : Nature News & Comment

JIJI PRESS/AFP/Getty Images

Masayo Takahashi is the first to implant tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells into a person.

Its awesome, its amazing, Im thrilled, Ive been waiting for this, says Jeanne Loring, a stem-cell biologist at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. She is one of several researchers around the world to welcome the news that a Japanese woman with visual impairment had become the first person to receive a therapy derived from stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells.

A lot rides on this trial. If the procedure proves safe, it could soften the stance of regulatory bodies in other nations towards human trials of iPS cells, and it could pave the way for treatments for other conditions, such as Parkinsons disease and diabetes. It could also cement Japan, recently plagued by a stem-cell scandal, as a frontrunner in iPS-cell research.

Pioneered in 2006 by Shinya Yamanaka, now director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Applications at Kyoto University, iPS cells are created by inserting certain genes into the DNA of adult cells to reprogram the cells back to an embryonic-like state. The cells can then be turned into almost any tissue type, much as embryonic stem cells can. But because iPS cells can be derived from a patients own tissue, the hope is that they will dodge some of the controversial aspects and safety concerns of those derived from embryos.

In 2012, Yamanaka received a Nobel prize for his work, and the field has now matured, with teams across the world champing at the bit to test therapies based on iPS cells in people. Loring, for example, uses the cells to create dopamine-producing neurons as a potential therapy for Parkinsons disease, and says that she will start clinical trials as soon as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gives the go-ahead.

Still, tissues made from iPS cells carry their own concerns, and that had stopped any country from approving them for a clinical trial. The bodys immune system could attack them, or they might contain some cells that are still in the pluripotent state and cause cancerous growths although Loring points out that this has not happened with human trials of therapies based on embryonic stem cells, for which the same concerns would apply.

In July 2013, however, Japans regulatory authorities gave the go-ahead for a team led by ophthalmologist Masayo Takahashi at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology (CDB) in Kobe to collect cells to be used in a clinical iPS-cell pilot study.

Her team took skin cells from the first patient, a woman in her seventies who had retinal damage owing to a condition known as age-related macular degeneration. The researchers then reprogrammed the skin cells into iPS cells and coaxed the unspecialized cells into becoming retinal tissue. On 8September, Takahashi provided evidence that those cells were genetically stable and safe, a prerequisite for them to be transplanted into the eye. The procedure took place four days later, and RIKEN has reported that the patient experienced no serious side effects.

In this instance, the womans vision is unlikely to improve. However, researchers around the world are watching to see whether the cells stop the retina from deteriorating further and whether any side effects develop. Should the woman experience serious consequences, iPS-cell research could be set back years, much as gene therapy was in 1999 when a patient died in a trial that attempted to use a modified gene to correct a type of liver disease. That wakes me up at night, Loring admits.

Link:
Japan stem-cell trial stirs envy : Nature News & Comment

Comments Off

Controlling the transition between generations

2 hours ago

Rafal Ciosk and his group at the FMI have identified an important regulator of the transition from germ cell to embryonic cell. LIN-41 prevents the premature onset of embryonic transcription in oocytes poised for embryonic development, thus ensuring a successful passage between generations. This finding also holds promise for efforts to reprogram differentiated human cells into induced pluripotent stem cells.

Fertilization triggers one of life’s most sweeping transitions – the transition from one generation to the next and, most intriguingly for developmental biologists, from unipotent germ cells to pluripotent embryonic cells. During this transition, fully differentiated and totally specialized reproductive cells (oocytes and sperms) morph into embryonic cells with an unlimited potential to give rise, once again, to all the specialized cells in the body. It is as if a seasoned astronaut suddenly gained the potential to become a concert pianist, car mechanic, Formula One pilot, banker, physician or philosopher. A better understanding of this transition is essential for progress in stem cell therapy and regenerative medicine, where scientists are currently trying to coax fully differentiated cells, such as epithelial cells, into a more pluripotent state. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular processes are still largely unknown.

FMI scientists led by Rafal Ciosk have now identified a protein that prevents the premature onset of this transition, thus ensuring a successful passage between generations.

“Interestingly, the majority of ‘molecular roadblocks’ to reprogramming that have been identified so far are epigenetic regulators. Here, we show that – at least in germ cells – LIN-41 may fulfill an analogous role in the cytoplasm,” comments Ciosk.

But the implications of Ciosk’s findings may go beyond the worm: LIN-41 has recently been shown to promote reprogramming of differentiated human cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. “This is the beauty of the worm as a model organism. We can observe and interfere with fundamental processes in living organisms and thus identify candidates which are highly likely to be relevant in similar processes in humans.”

Explore further: Nuclear transfer to reprogram adult patient cells into stem cells demonstrated

More information: Tocchini C, Keusch JJ, Miller SB, Finger S, Gut H, Stadler MB, Ciosk R “The TRIM-NHL Protein LIN-41 Controls the Onset of Developmental Plasticity in Caenorhabditis elegans” PLoS Genet. 2014 Aug; 10(8):e1004533

The capacity to reprogram adult patient cells into pluripotent, embryonic-like, stem cells by nuclear transfer has been reported as a breakthrough by scientists from the US and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

A group of researchers from the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona have described the role of a protein that is crucial for cell reprogramming. The discovery also details the dynamics of this protein as well as its …

See the article here:
Controlling the transition between generations

Comments Off

Japan carries out first iPS stem cell implant surgery (Update)

Japanese researchers Friday conducted the world’s first surgery to implant “iPS” stem cells in a human body in a major boost to regenerative medicine, two institutions involved said.

A female patient in her 70s with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common medical condition that can lead to blindness in older people, had a sheet of retina cells that had been created from iPS cells implanted.

“It is the first time in the world that iPS cells have been transplanted into a human body,” a spokeswoman for Riken, one of the research institutions, told AFP.

The research team used induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cellswhich have the potential to develop into any cell in the bodythat had originally come from the skin of the patient.

Until the discovery of iPS several years ago, the only way to obtain stem cells was to harvest them from human embryos.

“We feel very much relieved,” ophthalmologist Masayo Takahashi, the leader of the project at Riken, told a news conference after the surgery in Kobe.

“We want to take it as a big step forward. But we must go on and on from here.”

In a statement, the institution said that “no serious adverse phenomena such as excessive bleeding occurred” during the two-hour procedure.

The surgery is still at an experimental stage, but if it is successful, doctors hope it will stop the deterioration in vision that comes with AMD.

The patientone of six expected to take part in the trialwill be monitored over the next four years to determine how well the implants have performed, whether the body has accepted them and if they have become cancerous.

See original here:
Japan carries out first iPS stem cell implant surgery (Update)

Comments Off

Technology and Science News – ABC News

Get the latest science news and technology news, read tech reviews and more at ABC News.

Read the original:
Technology and Science News – ABC News

Comments Off

Japan carries out first iPS stem cell implant surgery

Japanese researchers Friday conducted the world's first surgery to implant "iPS" stem cells in a human body in a major boost to regenerative medicine, two institutions involved said. A female patient in her 70s with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common medical condition that can lead to blindness in older people, had a sheet of retina cells that had been created from iPS cells …

See the rest here:
Japan carries out first iPS stem cell implant surgery

Comments Off

Japan carries out first iPS stem cell retina surgery

TOKYO: Japanese researchers on Friday (Sep 12) conducted the world’s first surgery to implant “iPS” stem cells in a human body in a major boost to regenerative medicine, two institutions involved said.

A female patient in her 70s with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a common medical condition that can lead to blindness in older people, had a sheet of retina cells that had been created from iPS cells implanted. “It is the first time in the world that iPS cells have been transplanted into a human body,” a spokeswoman for Riken, one of the research institutions, told AFP.

The research team used induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells – which have the potential to develop into any cell in the body – that had originally come from the skin of the patient. Until the discovery of iPS several years ago, the only way to obtain stem cells was to harvest them from human embryos.

“We feel very much relieved,” ophthalmologist Masayo Takahashi, the leader of the project at Riken, told a news conference after the surgery in Kobe. “We want to take it as a big step forward. But we must go on and on from here.”

In a statement, the institution said that “no serious adverse phenomena such as excessive bleeding occurred” during the two-hour procedure. The surgery is still at an experimental stage, but if it is successful, doctors hope it will stop the deterioration in vision that comes with AMD.

The patient – one of six expected to take part in the trial – will be monitored over the next four years to determine how well the implants have performed, whether the body has accepted them and if they have become cancerous.

AMD, a condition that is incurable at present, affects mostly middle-aged and older people and can lead to blindness. It afflicts around 700,000 people in Japan alone.

The study was being carried out by researchers from government-backed research institution Riken and the Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation Hospital.

Stem cell research is a pioneering field that has excited many in the scientific community with the potential they believe it offers. Stem cells are infant cells that can develop into any part of the body. Harvesting from human embryos is controversial because it requires the destruction of the embryo, a process to which religious conservatives, among others, object.

Groundbreaking work done in 2006 by Shinya Yamanaka at Kyoto University, a Nobel Laureate in medicine last year, succeeded in generating stem cells from adult skin tissue.

Go here to read the rest:
Japan carries out first iPS stem cell retina surgery

Comments Off

STAP co-author offers yet another recipe for stem cells

A senior co-author on controversial, and now retracted, stem cell papers has quietly posted new tips on how the research can be replicated.

Two papers claiming that stressing the bodys cell could produce embryonic-like stem cells, a process called stimulus triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP), were heralded when published in Nature in January but thrashed soon after when problematic images and figures were soon found.

That might not have been so worrisome if the experiments, which the authors called easy to do, were replicated, but various external groups tried and failed to do so. Co-authors in Japan responded with a tipsheet. Soon after that, the lead author on the paper laying out the fundamental STAP technology, Charles Vacanti of the Brigham and Womens Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, released his own, quite different, list of tips for reproducing STAP.Still no one succeeded in replicating the findings.

Since April, Hitoshi Niwa, awell-respected mouse stem cell specialist atthe Center for Developmental Biology (CDB) in Kobe and a co-author on the papers, has been giving a focused, last-ditch effort to replicate the experiment; on August 27, he reported no luck so far and suggested that light emission from dying cells, known as autofluorescence, might have been confused with fluorescent tags meant to signal conversion to the embryonic-like state.

During that period, the lead author on both papers, the CDBs Haruko Obokata, was found guilty of misconductandboth papers were retracted. Obokatas supervisor at the CDB, Yoshiki Sasai, committed suicide, andVacanti stepped down as chairman of Brigham and Womens Department of Anesthesiology, Preoperative and Pain Medicine. The CDB itself has halved in size.

One might have thought that STAP was finished.But Vacanti is not one to give up so easily.

Even when he finally agreed to retract the papers, he maintained, in a post on his departments website, that there has been no information that cast doubt on the existence of the stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency (STAP) cell phenomenon itself. Vacanti said that he was confident that Niwa would replicate the core STAP cell concept that my brother Martin and I originally hypothesized, and trust that it will be verified by the RIKEN as well as independently by others.

Now, in a note posted without fanfare on Vacantis departments websiteand dated September 3 one week after Niwa announced failure to replicate the findings Vacanti has offered his second revision to the STAP protocol.

In comparison his first revised protocol in March (Refined protocol for generating STAP cells from mature somatic cells), the new one (REVISED STAP CELL PROTOCOL. 09.03.14:) highlights the use of ATP in the solution, in combination with two stresses exposure to acid and physical pressure on the cell membranes that he used in the previous recipe. In recentmonths, our lab decided to re-explore the utility of a low pH solution containing ATP ingenerating STAP cells, Vacanti writes in the revised protocol. We found that while pH alone resulted in the generation of STAP cells, the use of a low pH solution containing ATP, dramatically increased the efficacy of this conversion. When this acidic ATP solution was used in combination with mechanical trituration of maturecells, the results were even more profound (emphasis original).

We made a significant mistake in our original declaration that the protocol was easy to repeat, the protocol continues. This was our belief at the time, but it turned out to be incorrect. Many of the steps described appear to be a function of the technique of the individual investigator. Consequently, the revised protocol below should increase the likelihood of success.

Read more:
STAP co-author offers yet another recipe for stem cells

Comments Off

First iPS stem cell retina surgery gives hope for AMD patients

click here to continue to article cliquez ici pour lire l’article weiter zum Artikel clicca qui per visualizzare l’articolo weiter zum Artikel ir a la noticia klik hier om door te gaan naar het artikel Yazya devam etmek iin tklayn Tovbb a cikkre

Here is the original post:
First iPS stem cell retina surgery gives hope for AMD patients

Comments Off